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P.E.

Time Allocation: PE is a GCSE option choice; therefore, during KS4, 2 hours per week are allocated to its study.

Exam Board: AQA

Course Content:

Students will complete modules in one of the following sports every 9 weeks - Football, Netball, Rugby, Table Tennis, Handball, Trampolining, Basketball, Athletics and Cricket. In addition, students will study theory consisting of the following:

Year 1

 

Summary of content to be taught

Health, fitness and well-being – Paper 2: Socio-cultural influences and well-being in physical activity and sport.

 

The meaning of health and fitness: physical, mental/emotional and social health- linking participation in physical activity to exercise, sport to health and well-being.

 

The consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

 

Obesity and how it may affect performance in physical activity and sport.

 

Somatotypes.

 

Energy use

 

Reasons for having a balanced diet and the role of nutrients.

 

The role of carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamins and minerals.

 

Reasons for maintaining water balance (hydration) and further applications of the topic area.

Health, fitness and well-being – Paper 2: Socio-cultural influences and well-being in physical activity and sport.

 

Arousal and the Inverted-U theory.

 

Application of how optimal arousal has to vary in relation to the skill/ stress management techniques.

 

Definition of and types of goals.

 

The use of and evaluation of setting performance and outcome goals.

 

The use of SMART targets to improve/optimise performance.

 

Basic information processing model.

 

Identify examples of, and evaluate, the effectiveness of types of guidance and feedback.

 

Skill and ability.

 

Classification of skill.

 

Revision of Year One content.

 

Mock exam.

 Year 2

 

Summary of content to be taught

Physical training – Paper 1: The human body and movement in physical activity and sport

 

Health and fitness recap, including the relationship between health and fitness.

 

The components of fitness.

 

Linking sports and activities to the required components of fitness.

 

Reasons for and limitations of fitness testing.

 

Measuring the components of fitness and demonstrating how data is collected.

 

The principles of training and overload.

 

Types of training.

 

Types of training (continued) with reference to the advantages and disadvantages of using these types for different sports.

 

Calculating intensity.

 

Considerations to prevent injury.

 

High altitude training and seasonal aspects.

 

Warming up and cooling down.

 

AOP

 

AOP

 

AOP

 

AOP

 

AOP

 

Bones and the functions of the skeleton.

 

Structure of the skeletal system/functions of the skeleton.

 

Recap on bones and functions.

 

Muscles of the body.

 

Structure of a synovial joint.

 

Types of freely moveable joints that allow different movements.

 

How joints differ in design to allow certain types of movement.

 

How the major muscles and muscle groups of the body work antagonistically on the major joints of the skeleton to affect movement in physical activity at the major movable joints.

 

How the major muscles and muscle groups of the body work antagonistically on the major joints of the skeleton to affect movement in physical activity at the major movable joints.

 

Pathway of air.

 

Gaseous exchange.

 

Blood vessels.

 

Effects of exercise – immediate, short and long term.

 

Mock Exam

Year 3

 

Summary of content to be taught

Sports psychology – Paper 2: Socio-cultural influences and well-being in physical activity and sport

 

Direct and indirect aggression.

 

Understand the characteristics of introvert and extrovert personality types.

 

Definition of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, as used in sporting examples.

 

Evaluation of the merits of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in sport.

Socio-cultural influences – Paper 2: Socio-cultural influences and well-being in physical activity and sport.

 

Engagement patterns and the factors affecting them.

 

Commercialisation, sponsorship and the media.

 

Positive and negative impacts of sponsorship and the media.

 

Positive and negative impacts of technology.

 

Conduct of performers and introduction to drugs.

 

Sporting examples of drug taking.

 

Advantages/disadvantages to the performer/the sport of taking PEDs.

 

Spectator behaviour and hooliganism, including strategies to combat hooliganism.

Applied anatomy and physiology – Paper 1: The human body and movement in physical activity and sport.

 

The structure of the heart.

 

The cardiac cycle and the pathway of blood – including revision of blood vessels.

 

Cardiac output and stroke volume.

 

Mechanics of breathing – including revision of gaseous exchange.

 

Interpretation of a spirometer trace.

Movement analysis – Paper 1: The human body and movement in physical activity and sport.

 

Lever systems.

 

Lever systems and mechanical advantage.

 

Analysis of basic movements in sporting examples – including revision of joints/muscles/bones.

 

Planes and axes.

 

Revision and exam technique including mock exam.

 

Summer exam .

 

Formative Assessment:

Students will be regularly assessed in the form of practical lessons, homework and tests/exams

Summative Assessment:

There are 3 elements to the final assessment of this course:

Unit 1 (60%): is externally assessed through 2 written examination papers of 1 hour and 15 minutes. This assessment will take place at the end of Year 11

Unit 2 Section 1 (30%): Students will be assessed in three practical performances in the role of player/participant. This assessment will be ongoing throughout KS4, they will then be externally and internally moderated in their 3 chosen sports in Year 11.

Unit 2 Section 2 (10%):  Students will be assessed on their analysis of their performance. This assessment will take place during Year 10

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Why you should consider studying PE:

The GCSE PE course is ideal for students who enjoy physical activity and wants to learn about the benefits of sport and exercise. You will:

  • develop knowledge and understanding through practical involvement
  • improve your own performance in a range of sports roles
  • If you are considering a sports-related career then our GCSE in PE is the right subject for you

What skills profile a GCSE PE student should have:

You should have an interest in physical education and sport, enjoy being active and appreciate the benefits of keeping fit and healthy.

What opportunities a GCSE in PE will lead to:

As well as being the ideal preparation for the A Level Physical Education course, GCSE Physical Education allows for progression to related vocational qualifications, such as BTEC Firsts and Nationals in Sport or Sport and Exercise Sciences. The course develops the transferable skills and key skills such as leadership, effective communication, teamwork and analysis of performance that employers are looking for and can lead to a wide variety of employment opportunities. This can include further training in areas such as recreational management, leisure activities, coaching, officiating, the fitness industry, the armed forces and the Civil Service

Famous FCHS sportsmen include:

James Shea (Arsenal goalkeeper), Giuliani Grazioli (Barnet, Peterborough, Stevenage & Bristol Rovers) Pelly Mpanzu Ruddock (West Ham), Joe Foley and Sean Grace (Leyton Orient), Declan Danaher (London Irish), James Brosnan (Fencing)

For more information, contact Mr James (KS4 co-ordinator) or Mr Cussell (Curriculum Leader)